FAQs.

We know you’ll have questions. That’s why we have an entire department dedicated to supporting our clients. Curious about coverage options? Need help filing a claim? Need to update your policy? Your team member is here to help.
What makes Aloe different?
To put it plain and simple: an effortless sign-up process, superior customer service, and 24/7-access to top industry professionals. From the moment you contact us, you’ll have a dedicated expert assigned to you that can help with everything from signing up to uploading documents. In addition, our à la carte experience allows you to pick and choose the coverage that’s right for you. With our Telemedicine line, you’ll be able to speak to a trusted professional at any time of day and save yourself a visit to the doctor’s office. Aloe is seamless and simple — the way healthcare should be.
I’m an independent contractor, is there a plan for me?
Our products are highly customizable and affordable. As an independent contractor, you’ll be happy to hear that you’re able to pick and choose the plan that’s right for you.
Are there options for business owners?
Our flexible Group Policy can be arranged to accommodate companies of varying sizes. Whether you have one employee or 45, we have a variety of coverage options for you to choose from. The minimum requirement is one W2 employee, but 1099 add-ons are welcome as well.
If I need to file a claim, what do I do?
Sorry to hear you’ve hit a snag and we want you up on your feet in no time!  If you have already been treated, fill out our 1ST STEP CLAIM FORM with your name, email, birthday, and a quick note of what happened, and we will be in touch with you shortly to help you navigate the claims process.
When does my coverage start?
The specific date your new health coverage starts depends on they type of insurance, the plan you choose, and when and how you apply. In general, if you apply between the 1st and 15th of the current month, your start date will be the 1st of the following month. Your Short Term plan will go into your effect when you receive the Certificate of Coverage from your Aloe representative. This will happen only after you have: – Signed and returned a formal offer from the insurer. – Paid the first month’s premium payment.
If I have a plan and need to see a doctor, what do I do?
– If you are experiencing a medical emergency and have yet to seek help, please dial 911 or head to the emergency room immediately. – If the situation is serious, but can wait for a doctor’s visit, please call us. You may schedule a visit with your doctor of record or ask us to schedule an appointment with a new physician. – If you don’t require serious medical attention, we have the ability to provide you with the closest and best in-network urgent care to keep your out-of-pocket cost at a minimum. – Not sure if your situation requires medical treatment? Call our Telemedicine line at any time to receive medical advice from a medical professional.
How much coverage do I need?
The amount of required coverage varies from person to person. Your age, current health status, medication needs, and frequency of visits to your doctor’s office will all affect coverage decisions. During our call, we’ll discuss all of the available options that fit your health and financial needs.
It’s my first time buying health insurance. Where do I start?
Not a problem! Aloe makes it easy to get your coverage up and running. Start by scheduling a call and filling out our application form. From there, we’ll reach out to you and provide you with an array of custom-made plans to choose from.
How long can I stay on my parents plan?
Under the Affordable Care Act, you’re able to stay on your parents’ plan until 26. After you lose coverage under your parents’ plan, you have 60 days to purchase your own policy. Worry not — we’ll guide you through every stage of the sign-up process. It’s a breeze from start to finish.
I don’t currently have a family doctor. Are you able to offer recommendations?
You bet. If you don’t have a physician of record, we can direct you toward some of the industry’s top professionals. You’ll be able to rest easy knowing that our extensive network includes top doctors from the nation’s top-rated hospitals and clinics.
What Types of Health Insurance Don't Use Open Enrollment?
Most health insurers in the United States use some sort of open enrollment program that limits sign-ups to a particular time each year. Here are some exceptions:

  • Medicaid, the state-based health insurance.
  • CHIP, the U.S. government’s Children’s Health Insurance Program.
  • Travel insurance.
  • Short-term health insurance doesn’t use open enrollment periods either.
  • In some cases, supplemental insurance products.

Affordable Care Act

The Affordable Care Act (ACA), also known as Obamacare, was signed into law on March 23, 2010. It mandates benefits, rights, and protections for all Americans while creating new rules for health insurance companies.

Appeal

If your insurer denies a claim, terminates your plan, or makes a benefits decision you believe is incorrect, you have the right to file a formal appeal. If you can’t resolve the issue directly, you can escalate the appeal to your state’s regulatory commission.

Benefits

The items or services covered under a health insurance plan. Covered benefits and excluded services are defined in the health insurance plan’s Certificate of Coverage.

Catastrophic Insurance

Health plans that meet all of the requirements applicable to other Qualified Health Plans (QHPs) but that don’t cover any benefits other than 3 primary care visits per year before the plan’s deductible is met. The premium amount you pay each month for health care is generally lower than for other QHPs, but the out-of-pocket costs for deductibles, copayments, and coinsurance are generally higher. To qualify for a Catastrophic plan, you must be under 30 years old OR get a “hardship exemption” because the Marketplace determined that you’re unable to afford health coverage.

Certificate of Coverage

This is your reference guide that contains all the fine print about:

  • Your eligibility for coverage.
  • How your insurance plan works.
  • Claims and payment processes.
  • What’s covered and not covered.
  • Prior authorizations and when they’re needed.
  • Continuation of benefits and care.
  • Health care fraud and grievances.

CHIP

Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) is an insurance program that provides low-cost health coverage to children in families that earn too much money to qualify for Medicaid but not enough to buy private insurance. In some states, CHIP covers pregnant women. Each state offers CHIP coverage and works closely with its state Medicaid program. You can apply any time. If you qualify, your coverage can begin immediately, any time of year.

Claim

A request for payment that you or your health care provider submits to your health insurer when you get items or services you think are covered.

COBRA

A federal law that may allow you to temporarily keep health coverage after your employment ends, you lose coverage as a dependent of the covered employee, or another qualifying event. If you elect COBRA (Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act) coverage, you pay 100% of the premiums, including the share the employer used to pay, plus a small administrative fee.

Coinsurance

The percentage of costs of a covered health care service you pay (20%, for example) after you’ve paid your deductible. Let’s say your health insurance plan’s allowed amount for an office visit is $100 and your coinsurance is 20%. If you’ve paid your deductible: You pay 20% of $100, or $20. The insurance company pays the rest. If you haven’t met your deductible: You pay the full allowed amount, $100. Generally speaking, plans with low monthly premiums have higher coinsurance, and plans with higher monthly premiums have lower coinsurance.

Elective Procedures

Elective procedures such as cosmetic surgery usually don’t involve a medical emergency. Some plans do cover some elective surgeries, while some don’t. Be sure to read through your benefits to find out what’s included in your plan.

Explanation of Benefits

An explanation of benefits (EOB) is the insurance company’s written explanation regarding a claim, showing what they paid and what the patient must pay. The document is sometimes accompanied by a benefits check, but it’s more typical for the insurer to send payment directly to the medical provider.

In-Network vs. Out-of-Network Provider

Out of network simply means that the doctor or facility providing your care does not have a contract with your health insurance company. Conversely, in-network means that your provider has negotiated a contracted rate with your health insurance company.

Marketplace

The marketplace is where you go to buy health insurance, switch plans or renew your plan during Open Enrollment. Most states use the federal marketplace, HealthCare.gov. If you live in California, Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Idaho, Kentucky, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Mexico, Nevada, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, or Washington, your state has set up its own insurance marketplace.

Maximum Out-of-Pocket

This the most you can pay out of pocket in a calendar year aside from your monthly premium. Your max depends on your plan.

Medicaid

Insurance program that provides free or low-cost health coverage to some low-income people, families and children, pregnant women, the elderly, and people with disabilities. Many states have expanded their Medicaid programs to cover all people below certain income levels. Whether you qualify for Medicaid coverage depends partly on whether your state has expanded its program. Medicaid benefits, and program names, vary somewhat between states.

Medicare

A federal health insurance program for people 65 and older and certain younger people with disabilities. It also covers people with End-Stage Renal Disease (permanent kidney failure requiring dialysis or a transplant, sometimes called ESRD). Medicare isn’t part of the Health Insurance Marketplace. If you have Medicare coverage you don’t have to make any changes. You’re considered covered under the health care law.

Minimum Essential Coverage

Any insurance plan that meets the Affordable Care Act requirement for having health coverage. To avoid the penalty for not having insurance for plans 2018 and earlier, you must be enrolled in a plan that qualifies as minimum essential coverage (sometimes called “qualifying health coverage”). Examples of plans that qualify include: Marketplace plans; job-based plans; Medicare; and Medicaid & CHIP.

Obamacare

The Obamacare, also known as the Affordable Care Act (ACA), was signed into law on March 23, 2010. It mandates benefits, rights, and protections for all Americans while creating new rules for health insurance companies.

Open Enrollment

Open Enrollment is a period of time each year when you can sign up for health insurance. If you don’t sign up for health insurance during open enrollment, you probably can’t sign up for health insurance until the next open enrollment period, unless you experience a qualifying event, in which case you can sign up during Special Enrollment.

Short-Term Insurance

Health insurance plans with a limited duration, typically several months. These plans are geared toward people who need temporary medical insurance to bridge the gap between longer term plans.

Special Enrollment

A period of time where you can enroll for health insurance outside of open enrollment. This exception allows you to sign up for health insurance under extenuating circumstances. Examples include: losing your job, moving, divorce or marriage, becoming a widow or widower, turning 26, COBRA insurance expiration, new baby.

Travel Insurance

Most regular health insurance plans provide partial or no coverage while you are traveling in another country. Travel insurance is a type of insurance that covers the costs and losses associated with traveling. It is a useful protection for those traveling domestically or abroad.

Qualified Health Plan

An insurance plan that’s certified by the Health Insurance Marketplace, provides essential health benefits, follows established limits on cost-sharing (like deductibles, copayments, and out-of-pocket maximum amounts), and meets other requirements under the Affordable Care Act. All qualified health plans meet the Affordable Care Act requirement for having health coverage, known as “minimum essential coverage.”

Get Started Today

Get customized quote options and experience the future of healthcare.

FAQs.

We know you’ll have questions. That’s why we have an entire department dedicated to supporting our clients. Curious about coverage options? Need help filing a claim? Need to update your policy? Your team member is here to help.
What makes Aloe different?

To put it plain and simple: an effortless sign-up process, superior customer service, and 24/7-access to top industry professionals. From the moment you contact us, you’ll have a dedicated expert assigned to you that can help with everything from signing up to uploading documents. In addition, our à la carte experience allows you to pick and choose the coverage that’s right for you. With our Telemedicine line, you’ll be able to speak to a trusted professional at any time of day and save yourself a visit to the doctor’s office. Aloe is seamless and simple — the way healthcare should be.

I’m an independent contractor, is there a plan for me?

Our products are highly customizable and affordable. As an independent contractor, you’ll be happy to hear that you’re able to pick and choose the plan that’s right for you.

Are there options for business owners?

Our flexible Group Policy can be arranged to accommodate companies of varying sizes. Whether you have one employee or 45, we have a variety of coverage options for you to choose from. The minimum requirement is one W2 employee, but 1099 add-ons are welcome as well.

If I need to file a claim, what do I do?

Sorry to hear you’ve hit a snag and we want you up on your feet in no time!  If you have already been treated, fill out our 1ST STEP CLAIM FORM with your name, email, birthday, and a quick note of what happened, and we will be in touch with you shortly to help you navigate the claims process.

When does my coverage start?

The specific date your new health coverage starts depends on they type of insurance, the plan you choose, and when and how you apply. In general, if you apply between the 1st and 15th of the current month, your start date will be the 1st of the following month. Your Short Term plan will go into your effect when you receive the Certificate of Coverage from your Aloe representative. This will happen only after you have: – Signed and returned a formal offer from the insurer. – Paid the first month’s premium payment.

If I have a plan and need to see a doctor, what do I do?

– If you are experiencing a medical emergency and have yet to seek help, please dial 911 or head to the emergency room immediately. – If the situation is serious, but can wait for a doctor’s visit, please call us. You may schedule a visit with your doctor of record or ask us to schedule an appointment with a new physician. – If you don’t require serious medical attention, we have the ability to provide you with the closest and best in-network urgent care to keep your out-of-pocket cost at a minimum. – Not sure if your situation requires medical treatment? Call our Telemedicine line at any time to receive medical advice from a medical professional.

How much coverage do I need?

The amount of required coverage varies from person to person. Your age, current health status, medication needs, and frequency of visits to your doctor’s office will all affect coverage decisions. During our call, we’ll discuss all of the available options that fit your health and financial needs.

It’s my first time buying health insurance. Where do I start?

Not a problem! Aloe makes it easy to get your coverage up and running. Start by scheduling a call and filling out our application form. From there, we’ll reach out to you and provide you with an array of custom-made plans to choose from.

How long can I stay on my parents plan?

Under the Affordable Care Act, you’re able to stay on your parents’ plan until 26. After you lose coverage under your parents’ plan, you have 60 days to purchase your own policy. Worry not — we’ll guide you through every stage of the sign-up process. It’s a breeze from start to finish.

I don’t currently have a family doctor. Are you able to offer recommendations?

You bet. If you don’t have a physician of record, we can direct you toward some of the industry’s top professionals. You’ll be able to rest easy knowing that our extensive network includes top doctors from the nation’s top-rated hospitals and clinics.

Get Started Today

Get customized quote options and experience the future of healthcare.

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Copyright ® 2018 Aloe LLC.

Copyright ® 2018 Aloe LLC.